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Piece: Indestructible Hulk Vol. 1 #1 Limited Variant Edition signed and remarked
By L/TD by Geek Expess
Total Loves: 0


Descripton: From a very rare set of variant covers, Ken Haeser creates vivid and defined strokes with his pen of choice to create his rendition of an Incredible being, coupled with the autograph of Mark Waid. This infamous brute goes by a name we hope to never read of in our newspapers, and his growing might and sheer teeth-gritting anger is rightfully yours if you can keep him in this glass case.
Piece: Wolverine Vol. 4 #1 Blank Variant Edition signed and remarked
By L/TD by Geek Expess
Total Loves: 0


Descripton: Haeser executes a profile of the lone Logan, beckoning to his roots as a masked superhero. Little needs to be said about the iconic mask. During Wolverine’s earliest conception as a Canadian agent, his appearance on The Incredible Hulk cover mistakenly used an extended cowl, which the creators decided to keep as it looked quite similar to Batman’s - another badass. The remark also reminds us of the classic two-color scheme costume, the fierce personality within it that welcomed a good fight in a scary husky voice, the most resilient healing capability and the strongest science-engineered bones to be infused into a body without killing it. Haeser’s careful delineation does much more in showing Wolverine than words could muster. One thing you should note, if you ever accept a challenge from this Wolverine, you won’t stand a chance.
Piece: Grimm Fairy Tales Halloween Special 2013
By L/TD by Geek Expess
Total Loves: 0


Descripton: Grimm Fairy Tales is the first comic series to be written by Joe Tyler, Ralph tedesco and Joe Brusha, the co-founders of Zenescope Entertainment who initially aspired to be a team of screenwriters. In Grimm, the team applied a scheme similar to a TV series - starting small and steady and ending big, opening up to a multiverse that ties everything together in a grander scheme. On the Grimm Fairy Tales cover, a consistency is also maintained with a usually semi-nude depiction of one of our beloved fairy tales. This limited variant cover copy is exclusively an urban semi-nude, without the fairy tale, by Elias Chatzoudis.
Piece: X-Men Vol. 2 #1H Variant Cover by Ken Haeser
By L/TD by Geek Expess
Total Loves: 0


Descripton: Carnage makes his way to the cover of another Dynamic Forces contribution by Ken Haeser. Carnage was created when Venom. alien symbiote, fused to a criminal with a track record that would make your Spider Senses go awry. Before its inception in the Spider-Man arc, Venom was a new concept design for a costume, which Marvel purchased for a mere $220 and expanded into an arc about a fierce parasite that Spider-Man hosts, giving him his black suit, and later chooses to separate from. All hosts after Parker took on the same black suit with the white spider insignia characteristic of Venom, along with those abnormal and featureless white eyes and grotesque tongue. This tells us that Cletus Kasady, the aforementioned criminal, has something distinctly evil to add those wispy reds to the living outfit… How has such a fear-instilling thing come to exist in the Marvel Universe? Venom was introduced in Secret Wars where it escaped containment after Spider-Man mistook it for a costume-fixing machine. Way to go, Spidey.
Piece: The Amazing Spider-Man: One More Day Pt. 1 Variant Edition signed and remarked
By L/TD by Geek Expess
Total Loves: 0


Descripton: In an homage to the classics on a fairly recent comic book, Ken Haeser’s drawing of masked Wolverine’s mug scowls behind cover artist Marko Djurdjevic’s Spider-Man, who is immersed in his thoughts over his suffering Aunt May and a decision that can change everything. Suffering is a constant in many of our heroes’ stories, and two Marvel heroes that fit the theme well are the two on this very cover. Both coming from tragic back stories, their later runs don’t change; Spider-Man gives up any recollection of his marriage to Mary Jane in order to save Aunt May, and the Wolverine undergoes several bouts of brainwashing, amnesia, fusing adamantium to his bones, having the adamantium ripped out of his body, fusing it back… No end in sight for the amount of pain these heroes must go through. That factor alone can make or break a dynamic hero. Placing these two together can instigate nothing less than the role pain plays in our favorite stories.
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